Ballot Access News: January 2011 Print Edition

Ballot Access News — January 1, 2011

Ballot Access News
January 1, 2011 – Volume 26, Number 8

This issue was originally printed on green paper.

Table of Contents

  1. MINOR PARTIES, INDEPENDENTS, ASK U.S. SUPREME COURT TO HEAR THREE IMPORTANT ELECTION LAW CASES
  2. MONTANA BALLOT ACCESS CASE GAINS
  3. BOOK REVIEW: VOTER TURNOUT IN THE U.S. 1788-2009
  4. LAWSUIT NEWS
  5. 2010 VOTE FOR GOVERNOR
  6. 2010 VOTE FOR U.S. SENATE
  7. 2010 VOTE FOR U.S. HOUSE
  8. TWO CHAMPIONS OF BALLOT ACCESS REFORM ON GEORGIA COMMISSION
  9. 2010 NON-MAJOR PARTY WINNERS
  10. NEW YORK LIBERTARIANS MISS PARTY STATUS BY 1,614 VOTES
  11. EUROPEAN UNION MAY GET INITIATIVE
  12. IF SENATOR LIEBERMAN RUNS IN 2012, IT WILL AGAIN BE AS AN INDEPENDENT
  13. AMERICANS ELECT
  14. SUBSCRIBING TO BAN WITH PAYPAL

MINOR PARTIES, INDEPENDENTS, ASK U.S. SUPREME COURT TO HEAR THREE IMPORTANT ELECTION LAW CASES

Minor parties and independent candidates recently asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear three election law cases. If the Court agrees to hear even one of them, that will be significant. The Court has not accepted a cert petition filed by a minor party or independent candidate since 1996, when the Court accepted Chandler v Miller, filed by a Georgia Libertarian candidate to overturn a law mandating drug tests for candidates for state office. The Court ruled the Georgia law unconstitutional.

Georgia Ballot Access

The first of the three cases to be filed in the Court is Coffield v Kemp, 10-596. It was filed on November 2, and the Court will consider whether to hear the case at its January 14 conference. On December 6, an amicus curiae in support of the case was filed by the Center for Competitive Democracy, the Coalition for Free & Open Elections, and Free & Equal.

The case challenges the ballot access laws for minor party and independent candidates for the U.S. House. Those laws have existed virtually unchanged since 1964, and since 1964, no one has ever managed to use them. They require a petition signed by 5% of the number of registered voters, which can only be collected in the first half of even-numbered years. Petitions must be notarized, which is expensive, and anyone who does any notary work may not be a petitioner. The candidate must also pay a filing fee equal to 3% of the office’s annual salary, which is approximately $5,000 for U.S. House.

The Supreme Court has said three times that ballot access laws that are so difficult that they seldom are used are probably unconstitutional, in 1974, 1977, and 1986. A concurring opinion by Justice Antonin Scalia said the same thing in 2008.

Also, in 1968, the Supreme Court struck down all of Ohio’s ballot access laws for minor party and independent candidates, and yet even Ohio had had independent candidates for the U.S. House on the ballot during the years those laws existed. Such candidates for U.S. House qualified in 1952, 1954, and 1962. The years of harsh ballot access laws in Ohio were 1951-1968, and they required independent candidates for the U.S. House to submit a petition of 7% of the last gubernatorial vote. However, Ohio did not require petitions to be notarized, and said any adult citizen who lived in the district could sign, whether registered to vote or not, and required no fee.

The 11th circuit had upheld the Georgia law on March 19, 2010, saying it could not reach any other decision because the U.S. Supreme Court had upheld the Georgia petition requirements in 1971, in Jenness v Fortson. The 11th circuit said maybe the reason no one has succeeded in getting on the ballot since 1964 is because no one has tried. The amicus brief rebuts that suggestion.

Connecticut Public Funding

On December 9, the Court was asked to hear Green Party of Connecticut v Lenge, 10-795. The case challenges a law that says an independent candidate, or the nominee of a new party, cannot get full public funding without both raising many private contributions and submitting a petition signed by 20% of the last vote cast.

By contrast, members of parties that got 20% of the vote in the last gubernatorial election only need to raise the small contributions, and need no petition.

The U.S. District Court in this case had declared the law unconstitutional, but the 2nd circuit had ruled 2-1 that it is constitutional.

The Supreme Court has only had one case in the past involving public funding. In 1976, it had upheld the presidential funding scheme, which awards primary season funds to any candidate seeking the nomination of any party (no matter how small) if that candidate raises $5,000 from each of 20 states. But in the general election, only nominees of parties that had polled at least 5% of the last presidential vote could receive public funding in advance of the election (but if the candidate polled 5%, he or she would then get general election public funding after the election was over).

The 2nd circuit majority had reasoned that because the 1976 decision upheld some discrimination in public funding, therefore any type of discrimination, no matter how extreme, must be constitutional.

The Connecticut law also awards extra public funding to any major party candidate who only has a minor party or independent candidate, when that minor party or independent candidate succeeds in getting public funding. That aspect of the Connecticut law is vulnerable, since it seems likely that five members of the Supreme Court do not believe that publicly-funded candidates should ever get additional public funding just because of some characteristics of their opponents. On March 28, 2011, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in the Arizona public funding case, over the constitutionality of extra public funding for certain candidates. That case is McComish v Bennett, 10-239 and 10-238.

Hawaii Ballot Access

On November 30, Ralph Nader asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear his Hawaii ballot access case, challenging the number of signatures. Nader v Cronin, 10-728.

The basis for the challenge is that the law is irrational, because it requires six times as many signatures for an independent presidential candidate as for an entire new party.

When a new party gets on the ballot in Hawaii, it is provided with its own primary, and it is very easy for that new party, or any qualified party, to run a candidate for any or all partisan offices in the state. Candidates only need 15 or 25 signatures (depending on the office) to get on a party primary ballot, and any voter can sign. Filing fees are only $75.

If the purpose of ballot access requirements is to keep ballots uncrowded, it is obviously absurd to require six times as many signatures for a single independent candidate, than for an entire new party, because a new party can put dozens of names on the ballot. But the lower courts shrugged off this argument. The 9th circuit opinion, upholding the law, is only a few pages, and is unsigned.

Hawaii is not the only state with a law that is irrational. Florida requires 112,174 signatures for an independent presidential candidate, but lets a new party on the ballot with no petition. Maryland requires three times as many signatures for an independent statewide candidate as for an entire new party. Texas requires 40% more signatures for an independent presidential candidate than for either a new party, or an independent candidate for other statewide office. Alabama requires an independent candidate for U.S. House to submit more signatures than an independent presidential candidate.


MONTANA BALLOT ACCESS CASE GAINS

On December 10, the 9th circuit ruled that the Montana ballot access filed in 2008 is valid and should proceed. The case, Kelly v McCullough, challenges the March petition deadline for non-presidential independent candidates. The lower court had dismissed the case, saying the plaintiffs lack standing, but the 9th circuit says they do have standing, and sent it back to the lower court.


BOOK REVIEW: VOTER TURNOUT IN THE U.S. 1788-2009

Voter Turnout in the United States 1788-2009, by Curtis Gans. 881 pages, published 2011 by CQ Press.

This is the first scholarly book ever published that has turnout data for all presidential, congressional, and odd-year gubernatorial elections, for all of United States history. In 1975 the Census Bureau had published estimated turnout for presidential elections 1824 to the present, in Historical Statistics of the United States, part 2. Also, the Census Bureau, the Committee for the Study of the American Electorate, the United States Elections Project, and Election Data Services, have all made estimates of turnout for recent elections. But until now, there was no reference book for turnout data for such a broad scope of elections.

Voter Turnout in the U.S. even has turnout data for all statewide primary elections, including presidential primaries and primaries held for other important office. The data for primary elections makes this a very useful reference book, even for readers who are not interested in voter turnout per se. There appears to be no other reference book that enables anyone to know what year each state held primaries (for office other than President) and which also tells how many votes were cast in each party’s primary (again, for office other than President).

The author of this compilation faced a stunningly difficult job. Just to gather the primary returns from the 100 years in which many states have been holding primary elections is a major achievement. In many southern states, the parties conducted the primaries, which makes some data especially difficult to find.

But an even more overwhelming job is calculating the number of potentially eligible voters, through the nation’s history. Because each state has its own laws on who can vote, and these laws have changed drastically over the years, this is no easy task.

Laws that prevent ex-felons from registering to vote are a special problem. Also it is not easy to know how many eligible voters live permanently overseas, because the Census Bureau does not count them. And it is always tough to know how many people are citizens and how many are not. Also some southern states made it impossible, in practice, for blacks to register to vote until the mid-1960’s,
and it is tough to calculate numbers for this as well.

This book would have been impossible to write, if the author, Curtis Gans, had not been devoted to the study of voter turnout ever since 1976. The price of the book, $200, will limit its circulation, but for those readers who would not be able to buy the book, it is a very good idea to ask your public library to purchase the book. The pages are eleven inches by nine inches. The book’s format is unusual; the longer dimension of each page is its width, not its height. That format is better for charts. The book weights 4.5 pounds.

The book contains no data about the number of registered voters. "Turnout" means the number of people who voted, divided by the number of people who were free to take steps to become voters.


LAWSUIT NEWS

Alaska: on December 22, the Alaska Supreme Court ruled that write-in votes need not be spelled correctly, if the voter’s intent can be ascertained. However, the Court also said that write-in votes are not valid if the voter forgot, or didn’t know, to fill in the oval next to the name. As a result of the decision, Lisa Murkowski has won the U.S. Senate election. Miller v Treadwell, S-14112.

California: on December 15, the State Supreme Court said it won’t hear Field v Bowen, the case that challenged the discriminatory policy on party labels under the new "top-two" system. Probably the Court wants to watch the case go through the Court of Appeals first; also the Court may assume the legislature will fix the problem.


2010 VOTE FOR GOVERNOR

~

Republican

Democrat

Consti

Lib’t.

Green

Indpc

oth(1)

oth(2)

indp.

Alab.

860,472

625,710

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

Alas.

151,318

96,519

~

2,682

~

~

4,775

~

~

Ariz.

938,934

733,935

~

38,722

16,128

~

~

~

~

Ark.

262,784

503,336

~

~

14,513

~

~

~

~

Cal.

4,127,391

5,428,149

166,312

150,895

129,224

~

92,851

43

~

Colo.

199,034

912,005

651,232

13,314

~~

~~

~~

~~

12,059

Conn.

560,874

540,970

~

~

~

~

26,308

17,629

~

Fla.

2,619,335

2,557,785

~

~

~

123,831

~

~

58,663

Ga.

1,365,832

1,107,011

~

103,194

~

~

~

~

~

Hi.

157,311

222,724

~

~

~

~

1,265

~

1,263

Ida.

267,483

148,680

~

5,867

~

~

~

~

30,505

Ill.

1,713,385

1,745,219

~

34,681

100,756

~

~

~

135,705

Iowa

592,079

484,798

~

14,398

~

~

21,275

2,757

3,884

Kan.

530,760

270,166

~

22,460

~

~

15,397

~

~

Me.

218,065

109,387

~

~

~

~

~

~

242,690

Md.

776,319

1,044,961

8,612

14,137

11,825

~

~

~

~

Mass.

964,866

1,112,283

~

~

32,895

~

~

~

184,395

Mich.

1,874,834

1,287,320

20,818

22,390

20,699

~

~

~

~

Minn.

910,462

919,232

~

~

6,188

251,487

7,516

10,272

~

Nebr.

360,645

127,343

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

Nev.

382,350

298,171

5,049

4,672

4,437

~

~

~

9,619

N.H

205,616

240,346

~

10,089

~

~

~

~

~

N.M.

320,871

279,888

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

N.Y.

1,290,017

2,610,123

~

48,386

59,928

146,646

232,264

266,799

~

Ohio

1,889,180

1,812,047

~

92,116

58,475

~

~

~

~

Okla.

625,506

409,261

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

Ore.

694,287

716,525

20,475

19,048

~

~

~

~

~

Pa.

2,172,763

1,814,788

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

R.I.

114,911

78,896

~

~

~

~

22,146

~

126,337

So.C.

690,525

630,534

~

~

12,483

~

7,631

~

~

So.D.

195,046

122,037

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

Tenn.

1,041,576

529,983

~

~

1,886

~

2,584

~

25,631

Tex.

2,737,481

2,106,395

~

109,211

19,516

~

~

~

~

Utah

412,151

205,246

~

12,871

~

~

~

~

~

Vt.

115,212

119,543

~

~

~

~

1,819

429

3,942

Wis.

1,128,941

1,004,303

~

6,790

~

~

~

~

18,881

Wyo.

123,780

43,240

~

5,362

~

~

~

~

~

TOT.

33,592,396

32,998,859

872,498

731,285

488,953

521,964

435,831

297,929

853,574

Parties in the "Other(1)" column are: Alaskan Independence (Ak.), Peace and Freedom (Ca.), Working Families (Ct.), Free Energy (Hi.), Iowa Party (Ia.), Reform (Ks.), Grassroots (Mn.), Conservative (N.Y.), Moderate (R..I.), United Citizens (S.C.), Prohibition (Tn.), U.S. Marijuana (Vt.). Parties in the "Other(2)" column are Socialist Workers (Cal. and Iowa), Independent Party (Ct.), these parties in Minnesota: Ecology Democracy 6,180 and Resource 4,092, these parties in New York: Working Families 154,847, Rent is 2 Damn High 41,131, Taxpayer 25,820, Freedom 24,572, Anti-Prohibition 20,429, and in Vermont, Liberty Union.

Gub totals in 2006 were: Democratic 33,077,885; Republican 29,146,681; Green 900,455; Libertarian 447,203; Constitution 193,896; Independence 332,396; other parties 504,994; independents 1,753,556.

Gub. totals in 2002 were: Republican 30,766,464; Democratic 27,727,271; Green 830,620; Libertarian 799,086; Nat. Law 215,571; Constitution 150,030; Reform 11,783; Soc. Workers 3,361, Independence 1,018,550; other parties 374,497; independents 404,167.

Gub. totals in 1998 were: Republican 29,455,412; Democratic 25,149,416; Reform 1,355,731; Constitution 423,176; Libertarian 362,337; Green 214,130; Natural Law 106,414; other parties 609,390.


2010 VOTE FOR U.S. SENATE

~

Rep.

Dem.

Lib’t.

Green

Constit.

Wk.Fm

oth(1)

oth(2)

indp., w-i

Ala.

968,181

515,619

~

~

~

~

~

~

1,699

Alas.

90,740

60,007

1,454

~

~

~

~

~

105,183

Ariz.

1,005,615

592,011

80,097

24,603

~

~

~

~

6,158

Ark.

451,618

288,156

~

14,430

~

~

~

~

25,753

Cal.

4,217,366

5,218,441

175,242

128,510

125,441

~

135,093

41

26

Colo.

822,731

851,590

22,589

38,768

~

~

19,415

~

17,193

Ct.

498,341

605,204

~

~

~

30,836

11,275

6,735

45

Del.

123,053

174,012

2,101

~

~

~

8,201

~

35

Fla.

2,645,743

1,092,936

24,850

~

4,792

~

~

~

1642,785

Ga.

1,489,904

996,516

68,750

~

~

~

~

~

88

Hi.

79,939

277,228

2,957

7,762

~

~

~

~

2,697

Idaho

319,953

112,057

~

~

17,429

~

~

~

91

Ill.

1,778,698

1,719,478

87,247

117,914

~

~

~

~

1,136

Ind.

952,116

697,775

94,330

~

~

~

~

~

260

Iowa

718,215

371,686

25,290

~

~

~

~

~

872

Kan.

587,175

220,971

17,922

~

~

~

11,624

~

~

Ky.

755,411

599,843

~

~

~

~

~

~

1,214

La.

715,415

476,572

13,957

~

~

~

5,879

~

53,171

Md.

655,666

1,140,531

~

20,717

14,746

~

~

~

2,198

Mo.

1,054,160

789,736

58,663

~

41,309

~

~

~

31

Nev.

321,361

362,785

~

~

3,185

~

5,811

~

12,065

N.H.

273,218

167,545

4,753

~

~

~

~

~

9,633

N.Y.

1,239,537

2,686,606

24,869

42,341

~

183,707

240,800

177,462

1,267

No.C.

1,458,046

1,145,074

55,687

~

~

~

~

~

1,272

No.D.

181,689

52,955

3,890

~

~

~

~

~

278

Ohio

2,168,736

1,503,286

~

~

65,856

~

26,454

~

50,748

Okla.

718,482

265,814

~

~

~

~

~

~

32,855

Ore.

566,199

825,507

16,028

18,940

14,466

~

1,448

Pa.

2,028,945

1,948,716

~

~

~

~

~

~

?

So.C.

810,771

364,598

~

121,472

~

~

~

~

21,953

So.D.

227,947

0

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

Utah

390,179

207,685

~

~

35,937

~

~

~

28

Vt.

72,699

151,281

~

~

~

~

1,433

2,731

7,034

Wash.

1,196,164

1,314,930

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

W.V.

230,013

283,358

~

10,152

6,425

~

~

~

15

Wis.

1,125,999

1,020,958

~

~

23,473

~

~

~

901

TOT.

32,940,025

29,101,467

780,676

526,669

338,593

233,483

480,451

186,969

2,000,132

Parties in the "Other(1)" column are: Peace & Freedom (Ca.), Reform (Co., Ks. and La.), Independent Party (Ct. and De.), Tea (Nv.), Socialist (Oh. and Vt.), Conservative (N.Y.), Progressive (Or.). Parties in "Other(2)" column are: Soc. Workers (Ca.), Ct. for Lieberman (Ct.), Independence (N.Y.), U.S. Marijuana (Vt.).

US Senate totals in 2008 were: Democratic 34,481,981; Republican 29,492,211; Libertarian 807,520; Green 436,600; Constitution 227,529; Independence 437,404; other parties 79,110; independent 224,934.

US Senate totals in 2006 were: Democratic 33,623,073; Republican 26,498,032; Libertarian 624,258; Green 386,088; Constitution 133,065; other parties 720,334; independent 939,928.

U.S. Senate totals in 2004 were: Democratic 43,630,378; Republican 39,956,419; Libertarian 770,185; Constitution 401,069; Green 157,533; Reform 22,599; Socialist Workers 16,753, other parties 1,044,293; independents 239,795.

U.S. Senate totals in 2002 were: Republican 21,593,229; Democratic 19,807,922; Libertarian 864,349; Reform 175,107; Green 129,475; Constitution 32,159; Natural Law 10,716; other parties 61,965; independents 300,464.


2010 VOTE FOR U.S. HOUSE

~

Rep.

Dem.

Lib’t.

Green.

Constit.

Wk.Fm

oth(1)

oth(2)

indp.

Alab.

914,445

418,957

~

~

26,357

~

~

~

~

Alas.

175,384

77,606

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

Ariz.

900,510

711,837

72,216

9,066

~

~

~

~

4,506

Ark.

435,422

317,975

~

16,048

~

~

~

~

4,421

Cal.

4195,494

5148,828

142,363

46,626

56,907

~

30,714

~

23,628

Colo.

884,032

800,900

38,864


2,923

27,419

~

~

~

8,968

Conn.

457,976

634,947

~

8,892

~

33,036

2,310

955

~

Del

125,442

173,543

1,986

~

~

~

3,704

961

~

Fla.

3004,225

1853,600

~

~

~

~

35,506

3,244

219,052

Ga.

1528,142

940,347

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

Hi.

129,127

226,430

3,254

~

~

~

~

~

1,310

Ida.

263,699

150,884

4,696

~

~

~

~

~

27,865

Ill.

1720,016

1876,316

~

95,348

~

~

~

~

4,428

Ind.

972,671

679,462

84,289

~

~

~

~

~

11,218

Iowa

597,414

479,874

8,443

~

2,463

~

6,258

~

11,213

Kan.

528,136

274,992

27,360

~

~

~

5,041

~

~

Ky.

844,010

506,170

2,029

~

1,334

~

~

~

~

La.

675,386

311,221

~

~

~

~

~

~

49,340

Me.

248,170

316,156

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

Md.

674,246

1104,056

37,099

~

8.237

~

~

~

~

Mass.

808,305

1335,738

13,775

~

~

~

~

~

61,995

Mich.

1671,707

1415,212

43,279

25,739

27,273

~

~

~

10,594

Minn.

970,741

1002,026

~

~

2,492

~

84,816

~

28,877

Miss.

423,579

350,695

2,188

~

1,235

~

4,292

~

6,560

Mo.

1103,290

708,064

92,485

~

8,759

~

~

~

7,193

Mont.

217,696

121,954

20,691

~

~

~

~

~

~

Nebr.

327,986

137,524

~

~

~

~

~

~

20,036

Nev.

357,369

317,835

6,144

~

14,967

~

~

~

6,473

N.H

230,265

200,563

12,762

~

~

~

~

~

6,197

N.J.

1055,299

1024,730

8,536

7,494

4,120

~

3,284

~

18,121

N.M.

288,885

307,766

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

N.Y.

1560,011

2378,423

929

1,038

1,256

158,980

267,939

121,187

5,921

No.C.

1440,913

1204,635

16,562

~

~

~

~

~

~

No.D.

129,802

106,542

~

~

~

~

~

~

793

Ohio

2053,071

1611,100

101,549

2,000

26,722

~

~

~

30,556

Okla.

519,562

221,966

48,723

~

~

~

~

~

2,728

Ore.

657,007

733,369

10,872

21,924

3,855

~

~

~

~

Pa.

2034,145

1882,202

5,710

5,400

~

~

~

~

28,944

R.I.

126,951

185,711

~

~

~

~

~

~

22,342

So.C.

753,932

537,323

9,988

7,322

16,597

10,746

2,489

1,013

~

So.D.

153,703

146,589

~

~

~

~

~

~

19,134

Tenn.

955,078

541,527

800

3,619

~

~

~

~

58,096

Tex.

3058,203

1450,150

212,100

2,868

~

~

~

~

20,868

Utah

390,969

218,236

7,252

~

18,317

~

~

~

5,721

Vt.

76,403

154,006

~

~

~

~

3,222

~

4,704

Va.

1186,098

911,116

23,681

~

~

~

21,374

21,649

20,353

Wa.

1135,166

1296,502

~

~

~

~

~

~

47,741

W.V.

283,085

227,857

~

~

3,431

~

~

~

~

Wis.

1165,761

938,690

4,311

~

~

~

~

~

30,013

Wyo.

131,661

45,768

9,253

~

~

~

~

~

~

TOT.

44,540,590

38,717,920

1074189

256,307

251,741

202,762

470,949

149,009

829,909

Parties in the "Oth(1)" column are: Peace & Freedom (Ca.); Independent Party (Ct. & De.); Tea (Fl. & N.J.); Socialist Workers (Ia.); Reform (Ks. & Ms.); Independence (Mn. & S.C.); .Conservative (N.Y.); Socialist (Vt.); Indp. Green (Va.).

In the "Oth(2)" column are: Socialist Action (Ct.); Blue Enigma (De.); Whig (Fl. & Va.); in New York, 118,540 Independence and 2,647 Socialist Workers; United Citizens (S.C.).


TWO CHAMPIONS OF BALLOT ACCESS REFORM ON GEORGIA COMMISSION

On December 14, Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp appointed 16 members to his Elections Advisory Council. They include Georgia’s independent legislator, Rusty Kidd, and Political Science Professor David Shock, a Libertarian activist. Last year Kidd authored a bill to eliminate petitions for minor party and independent candidates.

The Commission will hold public meetings all during 2011. These meetings will provide an excellent means for activists to raise the issue of ballot access. A somewhat similar committee in Florida also held many hearings in 1998, and at every meeting, someone in the audience raised the ballot access issue. As a result, Florida hugely improved its ballot access laws.


2010 NON-MAJOR PARTY WINNERS

Here is a list of winners in November for federal and state office who weren’t nominees of either major party:

Governor: Lincoln Chafee, Rhode Island.

U.S. Senator: Lisa Murkowski, Alaska

State Senate: Harri Anne Smith, Alabama 29th district; Bob Leeper, Kentucky 2nd district; Edward J. O’Neill, Rhode Island 17th district; Richard Woodbury, Maine 11th district.

State Legislature, Lower House: Rusty Kidd, Georgia 141st district; Ben Chipman, Maine 119th district; Bert Jones, North Carolina 65th district; Jenna Haggar, South Dakota 15th district; Kent Williams, Tennessee 4th district; Bob Ziegelbauer, Wisconsin 25th district; and these in Vermont: independents Will Stevens, Addison-Rutland 1 district; Adam Greshin, Washington 1 district; and Progressive Christopher Pearson, Chittenden 3-4 district.

The Progressive Party elected six other legislators in Vermont, but they were all also Democratic nominees as well as Progressive nominees. They are Senators Anthony Pollina and Tim Ashe, and Representatives Susan Hatch Davis, Mollie Burke, Sarah Edwards, and Sandy Haas.


NEW YORK LIBERTARIANS MISS PARTY STATUS BY 1,614 VOTES

New York defines a qualified party as a group that polled at least 50,000 votes for Governor. The final New York election returns show that Warren Redlich, the Libertarian nominee, received 48,386 votes. That definition has been in the law since 1936, and that is the closest miss any group has ever experienced. Other near misses were the American Labor Party’s 1954 total (46,886), the Communist Party’s 1942 total (45,220), and the Right to Life Party’s 2002 total (44,195).


EUROPEAN UNION MAY GET INITIATIVE

The European Union has tentatively approved an Initiative Process for itself. It would require 1,000,000 signatures. The signatures could be collected electronically. The initiative would also need a certain number of signatures from each of one-third of the member nations. The number from each country would vary, from 72,000 in Germany, to 4,500 in anyof the four smallest nations, Cyprus, Estonia, Luxembourg, and Malta.


IF SENATOR LIEBERMAN RUNS IN 2012, IT WILL AGAIN BE AS AN INDEPENDENT

On December 17, U.S. Senator Joseph Lieberman said that if he runs for re-election in 2012, he will again run as an independent. The U.S. Senate currently has three members who were elected even though they were not nominees of either major party: Lieberman in 2006, Bernie Sanders in 2006, and Lisa Murkowski in 2010. This is the first time since just before the 1942 election that the Senate has had that many members who were not major party nominees in their most recent election.


AMERICANS ELECT

Americans Elect, a new political party that wants to run a presidential candidate in 2012, has already completed ballot access petitions in three states.


SUBSCRIBING TO BAN WITH PAYPAL

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Ballot Access News. is published by and copyright by Richard Winger. Note: subscriptions are available!


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